Easy Ways to Refresh Your Bedroom for Spring

Out with heavy blankets and chunky knits and in with lightweight sheets and pillow covers.
Most of us welcome the warm weather with a swift change in wardrobe and forget all about our homes. But when high temperatures finally arrive, you really should refresh not just your shoe collection, but your home and specifically, bedroom, as well. Because while that faux fur throw kept you cozy all winter long, it won’t do you any favors come spring. We chatted with Ariel Kaye, CEO and founder of Parachute, to get her expertise on refreshing your bedroom for the season.
Swap out your sheets.

Bye flannel. Toss those heavy sheets for a linen or cotton percale that’ll keep you cool all spring and summer long, Kaye explains. “We often compare our percale to the perfect button down shirt—cool and crisp to the touch. This is a great fabric for those who want a fresh, cool feel during spring and summer.” Linen is also a great option as it’s breathable and durable.

Store those heavy blankets.

Again, there’s really no need for a heavy down comforter. If you’re not wearing a jacket outside, why wear one inside? This box pattern quilt from Parachute is a great replacement. “In the warmer months, I often shed my duvet comforter and use my quilt as a cover,” Kaye says.

Change window coverings.

It’s time to let the sunshine in. If you insist on keeping those light-blocking curtains, consider investing in sheer curtains to layer underneath that still give you privacy but let natural light into your space.

Replace anything that’s worn out.

“The change of seasons is a great time to evaluate the condition of your bedding, repair worn items and discard any pieces that may be underused or outdated,” Kaye says. And think beyond the sheets too. Consider replacing your pillows with all natural down or hypo-allergenic down filling.

Shower Plants Are Going to Transform Your Bathroom

This Pinterest-perfect trend does more than keep your bathroom Insta-ready.

Shower plants are everywhere right now—Pinterest searches for the topic are up by 302% —but it’s not for the reason you’d think. While a claw foot tub surrounded by cascades of ivy and lush aloe is downright Insta-worthy, plants also offer a natural defense against bacteria and the harsh chemicals found in traditional cleaning products.

Through the process of photosynthesis, simple household plants can remove harsh chemicals such as benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene from the air in your home. They can also help keep indoor air pollution in check, while upping the ante on your bathroom’s decor. Another bonus? The humid environment means you’ll never have to worry about forgetting to water your plants again.

With their low light and high humidity, bathrooms are well-suited for tropical plants that boast pollution-fighting capabilities. Below, we’ve highlighted six of the best plants to add to your bathroom RN.

Peace Lilies

Photo via iStock

With their lush green leaves and bright white blooms, peace lilies exude serenity but are powerhouses when it comes to tackling the problem of indoor air pollution. They’re also low-maintenance, making them a perfect pick for black thumbs. The leaves are toxic to pets, so make sure to keep them out of their reach.

Aloe Vera

Photo via JEngland Handcrafted

Beyond the healing properties of its gel, this iconic succulent acts as an air quality indicator. If the leaves start to exhibit brown spots, it’s a sign that the level of chemicals and pollutants in the air is high. Aloe plants like indirect light and only need to be watered sparingly.

Boston Fern

Photo via Bakker

Though it requires more maintenance than aloe vera or peace lilies, Boston ferns are one of the most effective plants at removing pollutants such as formaldehyde from the air. It also acts as a natural humidifier, which can be beneficial during the winter months when the air is dry. Mist regularly to maintain moisture and place in a spot with moderate, indirect light.

English Ivy

Photo via The Lovely Drawer/Domino

This elegant climber can help keep your bathroom clean and more hygienic by removing mold and fecal matter from the air—now if only it did floors…

Spider Plant

Photo via Decor Demon

Spider plants are almost impossible to kill, which makes them a particularly good pick for people with jam-packed agendas (or bad track record with plant care). In addition to kicking harsh chemicals to the curb, it can also help clear a room of carbon monoxide.

Snake Plant

Photo via Houzz

This hardy workhorse is about as fuss-free as they come. They can survive in both full sun or shade and only needs to be watered when the soil is completely dry. In addition to removing fumes and chemicals from the air, snake plants will help keep your bathroom smelling fresh in a totally natural way thanks to its odor-removing capabilities.

10 Designer-Approved Ways to Decorate on a Budget

Cutting corners when decorating on a budget can be a tricky affair. You don’t want to accidentally skimp in the wrong places—better to spend a little more on a couch that won’t fall apart in a year or two, and spring for a wool rug that doesn’t ignite in full if you look at it the wrong way. But somewhere, somehow, you’ll need to skimp. Designers, who are often catering to folks decorating on a budget, have some of the best tips for cutting costs without compromising quality. Here are some of our favorites.

Choose Natural-Fiber Area Rugs

While a high-quality area rug can be a great investment, it can also be an incredibly expensive one—which is one reason so many designers spring for natural-fiber rugs when they need large-scale coverage. (This 100 percent jute number from World Market is just $370 for a 9′ x 12′ and it looks quite luxe.)

“I like to use natural-fiber rugs layered underneath smaller wool rugs to “expand” the overall rug area,” says designer Lauren Liess.

Match Fancy Paint Colors

Rather than spring for a $300 bucket of paint (which is tempting, because the colors can be exceptional), designer Casey Kenyon recommends trying a Benjamin Moore match of one you’ve fallen in love with (they even have an app, Color Capture, that will help you snatch a color you see and love in the world). “By saving a few dollars [on paint],” designer Sabrina Soto says, “you can splurge on new accent pieces to complement your freshly colored walls!”

At the Connecticut home of Edie Parker accessories designer Brett Heyman, wall color makes a statement.

Paint Inexpensive Wood Furniture

If Bunny Williams thinks it’s a good idea, you might as well consider doing so yourself. Matte finishes will look sculptural, while high-gloss can make a statement.

A coat of paint transformed this rococo wood mirror in Bunny Williams’s Punta Cana home.

Speed Patina (When You Can’t Splurge on Antiques)

While we don’t advocate for faux-aging your walls or wood furniture to look “shabby-chic,” we do admit to sometimes speeding up the real work that nature can do—especially on natural materials like brass, copper, terra-cotta, and more.

The patina on this circa-1970s brass table in designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent’s home can be achieved on a new piece—with a little hard work from your faucet.

Use Found Natural Objects as Accents

“Taking a walk through the woods and collecting interesting things like bark, tree stumps, stones, and botanicals to press can yield striking results,” Liess says, by the same logic that flowers always brighten up a room.

A cypress tree root plays sculptural wall hanging in the living room of Liess’s home.

Buy Thrift Store Art

“Hunt for vintage art at places like Etsy, eBay, Chairish, and in thrift stores,” Liess recommends. We recommend hunting for them the way professional designers do and then giving them a more elevated look with these spiffing-up tips.

Thrift-store art looks elevated indeed in a Liess-designed bedroom (note: the juxtaposition against a refined dresser helps!).

Or Put Your Kids to Work

“Expose your children to the world of abstract art and let them have fun with paint in colors you’d like to see in your home,” Liess says. “En masse, [their art] can feel bold and sophisticated.”

“My son painted “portraits” and was so pleased when I hung them in our home,” Liess says of the artful lineup.

Two Words: Bamboo Blinds

When all you need is to filter the light (dapple: check), rather than block it out entirely, pick up a set of bamboo roller blinds from the hardware store. They’ll give your room a beachy feel—and cost far less than any other window treatment possibly could.

“The bamboo blinds are an essential element because without them it really gets too cold,” says Alexa Hampton of her New York City office. “They help give the space warmth and ground it.”

Know When to DIY

“Clients always think custom-made is more expensive,” Soto says, “That’s not always the case. I’ve made everything from neon serving trays to sofas for much less than the price you would pay at a boutique.” In case you’re not sure what you should attempt yourself, here’s our guide to knowing when to call on a pro.

Stick-on flooring is definitely something you can attempt yourself, as proven by Brady Tolbert’s rental kitchen transformation.

Wraparound Headboards: The Sexy, Unusual Bedroom Detail We Love

There’s something I really love about an upholstered headboard. It’s like a headboard that wants to be a pillow. Come, it says. Sit here. Lean on me. So of course I was delighted to find this photo of a bed from Dublin’s Dean hotel, which has an upholstered headboard that wraps all the way around the bed, to encase you in coziness while you sleep, or when you wake up.

The padded beds appear in the hotel’s Mod Pod rooms, which at 136 square feet, are quite small. The wraparound headboard is, in fact, a great setup for a small space, giving the bed a couch-like quality that encourages multiple uses.

You may have already noted that a headboard like the one above, which wraps around three sides of the bed, is really only possible if your bed is tucked into a little nook like the one above. But you can also create a headboard that wraps two sides of a bed placed in a corner, for much the same effect. Want to get the look? This project is actually a DIY, from Ann Sandy of Med et Lekent Sinn.

 

This daybed, in the living room of a New York apartment from Elle Decor, does double duty as both couch and guest bed. (I’m guessing this is probably a custom job, but the way the headboard matches the upholstery of the bedframe gives it a nice cohesiveness.)

In this photo from Glamour Nest, the wraparound headboard actually serves a very practical function: keeping the pint-sized occupant of this pint-sized bedroom from whacking himself on the wall.

 

And now for something a little bit different: a bedroom from House & Garden with a wraparound headboard that wraps not just the bed, but the nightstand too. Talk about an embrace! You still get the same cozy effect, but with the advantage that it’s much easier to make the bed.

In this California home spotted on 1st Dibs, a bed fits neatly into a little nook thanks to a wraparound headboard in the most beautiful blush pink suede. The tiny shelf that serves as the nightstand looks to be built into the headboard. It’s both incredibly stylish and incredibly cozy—exactly what you would want in a bedroom.